Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Alright, this rack is pretty straight forward once you understand it's parts, and goes on very easily and quickly. It comes with an assortment of extra hardware, so I figure I'd just point out what you do need and how to get it installed quickly. I do suggest you use some Locktite and maybe add your own lock washers to avoid bolts coming undone while riding due to vibration.

What you will need:

1 - 4mm Allen wrench
1 - 5mm Allen wrench
4 - Sondors Frame bolts (they supplied some but the Sondors ones are much prettier)
1 - Ibera PakRak
2 - Ibera Height Adjustment Rod + 2 short screws and washers (supplied)

Optional:
Loctite (Blue)
Zip ties for cables that may rub along frame of rack or bike once installed

If you keep your seat low, you will need to raise it or remove it for now. And if you have a hanging seat back, it will have to come off to make room to work.

Ok. First off, loosen all of the bolts on the front assembly with the long curvy mounting arms, including the bolts that mount the arms to the connectors and to the rack itself. You want these to be free and loose for connecting to the bike.

Next, connect the Height adjustment rods to the bottoms of the rack's carrier leg on each side at the first screw hole "C".

Remove all of the bike's 4 frame Allen screws located both near the seat post and near the rear hub. Add a lock washer to these at this point if you wish, and put a dab of Loctite on each one's threads.

Take the rack and extend the front mounting arms out to the point where the rubber stoppers on the underside are all that is left on the back of the mounts on the rack itself. I recommend removing these as they are going to be in the way, but they serve as a good reminder as to how far out the rods have to go. Make sure all of the Allen bolts are loose on the rack and the arms at this point.

Hold the rack over the back wheel, extending the arms forward and level it more or less, then carefully install the 2 Allen bolts on each side at the rear bottom of the rack on the Height Adjustment rod, into the frame itself. Just screw them in enough to keep it on the bike, we'll tighten them down more once done.

Next, carefully extend each mounting arm out, turning it's bend so that the hold and flat part that will go to the bike is aligned with the bike (see the photos) and gently install each of the two frame Allen bolts near the seat into the holes. Again, just do them tight enough to keep things on the bike. It should be a pretty rigid fit as it is now.

Now you will want to move the frame as needed forward or backward and to the left and right to center and level it. Once you've done this, tighten the lower frame bolts down by the rear hub well.

Now tighten the bolts on the upper mount arms to the bike, being sure to get them nice and tight, Loctite and locking washing installed if you can. At this point all that should be left is to make sure its straight and then tighten up both forward frame bolts that hold the mountain arms as well as the bolts that hold the arms to the frame that can slide left/right.

Your frame is now installed. Give all the bolts a good once over for safety. Then put your seat back how you like it. If you have been using a hanging seat pack, it will most likely not fit unless you keep your seat pretty high. I had to remove mine and am not sure where to put it at this point since I keep my seat kind of low.

Note that if you have any kind of light or reflector for the rear, there's a nice place on the back of the rack underneath to mount it. I am going to put my rear light that is normally on my post there once I fashion a bracket.

Congrats, you now have a nice versatile rack to carry your goodies as you ride. And, if you take some plastic and cut it to fit and ziptie to the bottom of the rack, you've got a nice fender to boot.

IMG_4168.jpg

IMG_4169.jpg

IMG_4173.jpg

IMG_4172.jpg

IMG_4171.jpg

IMG_4175.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Notes. If you wish to make the rack ride lower, you are going to have to cut the forward mounting arms off at the tail ends. At the stock height, they are sticking right up against the frame of the rack itself due to the angle. I recommend you don't cut them until you are totally sure the height change works since you need that little bit on the ends for the normal mount height.

I don't know if the Rak Bag designed for this will fit based on where our stock seat sits. I need to see if the seat can be slide forward a little for that. I don't personally plan on adding the bag, I will just strap down my bag with assorted stuff in it when I need it.

IMG_4170.jpg

IMG_4174.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GMTA! NIce, looks good :D

I was hoping the side bag frame parts would stick out further so I could put water bottle mounts on them but I am happy they don't now, makes my bike sleeker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I totally forgot to link to the rack in this thread! Sorry.

Ibera PakRack Touring Carrier - IB-RA5
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B002T5OG5Y/ref=asc_df_B002T5OG5Y4108312?smid=A30U5R8UY24S21

And the optional snap on bag, Ibera Commuter Trunk Bag
http://www.amazon.com/Ibera-PakRak-Bicycle-Quick-Release-Commuter/dp/B002T5MZ70/

Apologies for leaving that important detail out. Make sure to get this model as it fits without extra brackets. :D

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for this. I got it and installed it Mine was missing the longer screws for the spacers, but I don't think i need them. I did take a pair of pliers and bend up the light mounting bracket, folding it over on itself, since I have ordered fenders and there wasn't going to be enough clearance with that hanging down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my bike shop said they could not install.. You would have to raise the seat so high couldn't touch the ground.. I tried working with this rack but no luck not enough room on the seat height I need.. What about the bell 310 rack which attaches to seat post.. In pictures of this one looks like you only have to raise the seat a little, plus the rack can be adjusted to slide backwards so seat does not hit the front part of rack... What do you think ???

BellBikeRack310.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'm a 6' tall cyclist and to pedal efficiently, with my legs fully extended just before my knees lock, i have the seat height set where I can't reach the ground either when I stop. I have to step off and straddle the top tube or stop right next to the curb if one is available, to put my right foot down. This is the rack I purchased but I have modified it but not affecting the height. I had to create a spacer on the rear brake side chainstay, for that side, to clear the caliper. http://tinyurl.com/TabletteersRack

image.jpeg

i also added a 52v 14ah rack battery to my bike but wanted it under the racks top surface because I carry cargo (50# bags or Pedigree Dog Food) and don't want that weight on a $500 battery, and I had to widen the rack about 3/8 of an inch to accomplish that. Not something I'd recommend. On this particular rack you can fabricate new custom bottom mounting supports out of sheet metal stock from Home Depot and move the rack, forward or back, where ever you want. The support arm that attach the rack to the seat stays are full adjustable.  I fabricated doublers for those brackets on my rack for extra strength because of the loads I carry.  Pretty simple task if you have a saber saw with a metal cutting blade, some files to smooth out the cuts and a can of black spray paint. Probably not the kind of solution you're looking for but just the kind of stuff that I enjoy. )) 

image.jpeg

im not a fan of Seat Post Racks but only because they don't have enough utility for the things I normally carry and beside a small and huge set of panniers I can switch between, I often ride with a backpack. Those racks seem to be gaining a lot of popularity. I think they look cool with a small duffle bag attached that appears to be just suspended in midair. Might be just your ticket. https://youtu.be/iyp9fh-u4w8

Front Brake Adjustment Procedure

https://youtu.be/pIo7wx0fK_M

 

Edited by Reddy Kilowatt
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having a real problem with finding a rear rack for fat tire .I have tried the Iberia pack rack then a bell 310 that clamps to seat post but problem with both is I have to raise the seat too high for comfort.  Wonder if there is a front rack you have seen.. any other sugge suggestions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You folks who say you can't use the rack due to height... how tall are you?  Better yet:  I am 6'0" with a 33 inseam (when I can get it, 34 if not). 

Just placed my Sondors order so I'll be awhile although the holiday special I picked said reduced wait time.  Point being I have no bike to stand over at the moment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@MoneyPit - For what it's worth, I am 5'7" 32"inseem. I have my seat down almost to a point where there's no room for a bag under the seat and the rack there is super small. At 6/33 you should be fine. You may just have to sacrifice storage space between seat and bike but it should be OK. Also depends on the seat, I replaced mine with something larger and more springy for my honey butt. I can take a picture if it helps. I think there are shots of it in this thread too. Just don't remember if they had the original seat. That was BR for me so I dont remember much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK that gives me the reference I need.  Thank you!  There IS a pic where I can see the seat vs. rack placement so I suspect I'll put mine up a bit higher.  Bottom line is I should be able to do the rack.  Really looks like a good fit and a solid product.

Has anyone given any thought to the IB-PA16 panniers vs. the commuter trunk bag?  The latter's design sounds attractive but it looks like it puts weight up high vs the saddle bags.

Link: http://a.co/9oL5HR8

No clue about the attachment solidity of the bags.

Edited by MoneyPit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@MoneyPit - The only thing I know about the primary top bag is that it and the seat get in the way of each other depending on the seat and height. I believe at least one person here is using it. I got one and it wouldn't fit under the seat part, the seat smashed the bag down enough I had to remove to fill so it was returned.

The Panniers - I seem to remember someone here posting pics of theirs but I dont know if they were the same brand or a 3rd party brand. As long as they fit the rack, stay on, and don't get in the way of anything in back they should work. But Ive not tried. So this is just me guessing. Someone else have actual experience?

Also, I might also note I'm not using the stock tires, mine are 2.5" I believe and the bike does sit maybe an inch lower. So seat height is different depending on that too.

Edited by alienmeatsack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MoneyPit

The Original Sondors Fat is Tall, with its 4.9 tires. I'm guessing a lot of owners are intimidated by the height and adjust their seats low, are midgets or think the Sondors make grand eMotorcycles, and abhor pedaling.  I'm a cyclist and like others who have posted, the Sondors (my primary HMO) not only keeps me in the saddle but makes our bikes and aging bodies perform like extremely fit youngsters.)) 

If you adjust your saddle height for max pedaling efficiency (full leg extension, just before knee lock without rocking your hips) or adjust the Iberia tail trunk, rearwards, you shouldn't have a problem. I use two different Panniers, depending on my mission; one large for my Grocery & Shopping errands and the smaller Iberia which carries essietials. It's has two lower side pockets, perfect for my charger on one side and cable lock and bungies in the other. The main compartments hold my foul weather gear and my cycle cover, if the forecast is sketchy although I avoid, at all costs, riding in the wet.

image.jpg

image.jpg

The iberia tail trunk is tall and one annoying problem that can arise, is swinging your leg over it to mount. I still push off with one foot on the ground, when starting, and swing that leg over my bikes, just like I've always done with all my bikes. Muscle memory and the repetitive action, are most comfortable for me when I launch. 

I will also add that I don't use the Iberia Rack, I optioned for an Axiom rack that I found cheaper and with multiple mounting options. I have highly modified it to better suit my needs, including widening it, mounting it backwards, altering the height, mostly to mount my 52V 14aH battery underneath the solid top platform I also added. 

image.jpeg
IMPORTANT: This post is intended for the use of the individual addressee(s)  named  above  and  may  contain information that is confidential,  privileged  or  unsuitable  for  overly  sensitive persons  with  low  self-esteem, no sense of humour or irrational religious beliefs. If you are not  the  intended  recipient,  any dissemination,  distribution  or  copying  of  this  email is not authorized (either explicitly or implicitly) and  constitutes  an irritating  social  faux  pas. Unless the word absquatulation has
been used in its correct context somewhere other than in this warning, it does not have any legal or grammatical use and may be ignored. No animals were  harmed  in  the  transmission  of  this forum post,  although  the  yorkshire  terrier  next door is living on borrowed time, let me tell you. Those of you with an overwhelming fear  of  the unknown will be gratified to learn that there is no hidden message revealed by reading  this  warning  backwards,  so just ignore that Alert Notice from Microsoft: However, by pouring a complete circle of salt around yourself and your  computer  you can  ensure that no harm befalls you and your pets. If you have read the post in error, please  add  some  nutmeg  and  egg whites  and place it in a warm oven for 40 minutes. Whisk briefly and let it stand for 2 hours before icing. Happy Holidays.

Edited by Tabletteer
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too come from a cycling background, which I had to give up a few years back.  I'm hoping a bump from an electric motor can get me back into the game... but I plan to pedal that thing.  My road bike frames sized best at 59C with a fair bit of seatpost showing, and my mountain bikes were always oversized according to the bike shop salesmen.

Rack and bagwise, my needs are fairly simple.  Work clothes, shoes and charger for now.  The PakRak is on my parts list as are the IB-PA16 panniers.  I don't see anything saying they are waterproof, but stuffing gear into kitchen trash bags has always served me well on that score.  To go even lighter I still have an old bulletproof Rhode Gear rack trunk in the garage.

Your pics remind me - I've been looking at seatposts with that in mind but plan to wait and see what fitment is like on the actual bike rather than guessing before I get hold of the thing.  Chief difficulty I have found is the diameter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can always also put your valuables into waterproof sacks in the bags on the bike. I do this with some of my camera gear inside another bag to keep it safe.

 

Seatpost wise - I dont know the diameter but I do know it was not easy to find a replacement without taking the original to the shop for them to measure. And it was an odd size if I remember correctly. Down one size fits you have to clamp it down better. Up a size fits if you hammer it in.

I have nbeen looking at posts too. But if I can find a seat I like, I am not as apt to replace the post. I do have one I wish fit one of my Sondors that is spring loaded inside and makes the ride a little nicer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, MoneyPit said:

Your pics remind me - I've been looking at seatposts with that in mind but plan to wait and see what fitment is like on the actual bike rather than guessing before I get hold of the thing.  Chief difficulty I have found is the diameter.

Zackly, correct size not avalable in 3T Carbon Fiber and I had to install a sleeve  but I wanted my carbon fiber to match thruout. 

One thing I find that might be an issue for you too is top tube length. I'm cramped, espically when standing and installed the longest reach stem 3T makes (my bikes are all 56 or 57). Of course, riding the Sondors, in a more upright position feels more natural than any of my road bikes, even at speed. 

You are correct, it's hard to avoid out-fitting your new ride but patients is prudent. Carefull assessment for what you'll actually require to fulfill your needs. You'll avoid many of the pitfalls that besieged some owners. You have quite an advantage though  with your cycling background. 

There is quite a lot of conjecture and missinformation posted here on the forum. 

Edited by Tabletteer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, Tabletteer said:

One thing I find that might be an issue for you too is top tube length. I'm cramped, espically when standing and installed the longest reach stem 3T makes (my bikes are all 56 or 57). Of course, riding the Sondors, in a more upright position feels more natural than any of my road bikes, even at speed. 

Yes I figure the bars are going to get moved around for sure.  I did go to Amazon and, for $31, purchased a 125mm adjustable stem that will let me try out different heights/orientations.  Once I know what I like I can look for a solid stem that meets the criteria.

@alienmeatsack You mentioned seatpost diameter:  It is 28.6 which seems to be a legacy size from beach cruisers, hence the reason no quality parts are available.  For $10 I sprang for a shim as I think there is just about zero chance I will not change the post... and its only 10 bucks.  This one:

http://a.co/2ZpZY2A

Its from Cane Creek, who make the Thudbuster suspension posts.  This is the piece that LunaCycle is missing that made them take their Sonders upgrade out of stock.  the Thudbuster is mighty pricey.  Nashbar sells a 350mm 27.2 diameter suspension seatpost that is on sale for $22.  

For me, I will hang onto the shim and if things go as expected will probably pick up a 400mm post from somewhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've posted this before for the new to cycling, that think a thick foam, gel or silicone seat is what's needed after their first sore butt from riding experience. Experienced cyclist rarely have padding in their saddles because they are informed from experience that a saddle that fits is more important than stuffing foam under your butt. 

 
 

What Makes a Saddle Comfortable?

"When you sit on a flat surface, the soft tissue between the surface and your ‘sit bone’ supports most of your weight. It is the same for bicycle saddles. Your behind might feel fine at first on a padded saddle because you are adding more ‘soft material’ between the hard surface and your ‘sit bones’. As the miles roll away and your behind becomes sore, the pain will just increase and the saddle sores will develop in the concentrated areas of your ‘sit bones’. This soreness will just reappear day after day and will never get better.

Most cyclists toss their existing bicycle saddle and buy another softer saddle hoping that will help. From my experience, it won’t solve your problem. Until you find a bicycle saddle that supports evenly and not just on your ‘sit bones’, you will be buying different saddles or will be living with the rear pain.

But someone told me to get a gel saddleimage.png or a gel pad? Gel is just another type of padding. All you will be doing is trying to fine a softer saddle. If you increase the thickness of the padding too much, your rear may bounce on the saddle. Bouncing will cause chafing in the inner thigh area.

 

Plastic Or Leather: Which Is Better For Touring?

Modern bicycle saddles are usually made from either plastic with covering, plastic with closed-cell foam and covering, or leather. On almost every bicycle you see in the store will be a variety of the plastic style. No matter what style of riding you will do, the manufacturer assumes that the saddle will fit your behind and that you will be happy. Unfortunately, this is hardly ever the case. The new owner will have to live with the outcome or break down and buy another saddle or two.

If the saddle is uncomfortable during the first mile, then it will be more uncomfortable as the miles roll away and will never get any better. The pain will result from the saddle supporting mostly on your two ‘sit bone’. Even with padding, this supporting area will not change. Consequently, your behind will hurt.

The racing cyclist usually rides on a narrow hard plastic or composite saddle with a lightweight covering, padded or non-padded. For short, fast rides where the rider regularly comes on and off the saddle and stays low on the handlebars or drops, these lightweight bicycle saddles perform fairly well.

The bicycle tourist has a different riding style than racers and most sport cyclist. Just the general nature of touring causes the posture of the body to be more upright and to spend more time directly on the saddle. As a result, the ‘sit bones’ will have more contact with the saddle. So the more surface area that you can spread the load out, the less painful contact you will experience. Unless your plastic saddle conforms perfectly to the shape of your behind, the surface will remain on your ‘sit bones’ and it will never change.

Check out the best touring saddles at REI.com

One of the things that a properly broken-in leather saddle offers is a perfectly formed platform for your behind to sit. As you ride a leather saddle, it will gradually conform to reduce the pressure points that cause pain to your behind. The results from a seasoned leather saddle will be a perfect mold of your behind that supports the entire area instead of just your ‘sit bones’.

Years ago I rode on leather saddles. As the newer padded saddle came on the market, I changed with everyone else. I had terrible behind pain and I almost gave up bicycling. Luckly, a few years ago I switched back to leather saddles.

Now I can ride 8 hours a day and not get saddle sores.

Over time I changed all my bicycles back to the leather bicycle saddles. I would highly recommend that you give a leather saddle a chance if you are having saddle soreness.

Is this article helping you? Then help support Bicycle-Touring-Guide.com. If you need to buy any bike gear and click on one of the links below, we get a commission and that helps keep this site afloat.

Thanks for your support!

Here’s where you can buy touring bike saddles:

 

Width Of Your Saddle

Everyone’s ‘sit bones’ are different and, as such, one width of saddle will not fit all. If the rear of the saddle is too narrow for you, then your ‘sit bones’ will hang over the saddle and will not support you behind properly; and conversely if the saddle is too wide, you will have severe chafing of your inner thighs. One word of caution, you need to verify the proper adjustment of your saddle before you switch it out. You don’t want to buy another bicycle saddle and the problem persists due to improper adjustment.

 

Do You Need Springs?

I believe that the modern sprung bicycle saddles have a definite advantage over other saddles in the right situations. Generally, if you ride in a more downward posture and your handlebar height is below your saddle height, then an unsprung saddle may be your better choice. Conversely, if you ride upright, like most tourists, and your handlebar height is at or above your saddle height, then a sprung saddle may be better.

A word of caution, I have found that the bicycle saddles with soft springs make you bounce a little, especially if you are spinning. Any bouncing will cause you to lose pedaling efficiency and chafing on your inner thighs. I have had extremely good luck with the stiffer springs as found on Brooks leather saddles. These springs have just enough spring to give you a slight rear suspension effect without bouncing you all over the place.

 

Issues For Men

During the last decade or so, there has been considerable concern about men’s impotency issues with standard bicycle saddles. The primary concern centers around the narrow, hard saddle pressing the penile arteries and reducing blood flow.

This problem has been debated even amongst the medical profession. If it is a concern for you, I suggest you talk to your doctor. However, I would suggest that you revisit your saddle adjustment by going to a bicycle shop and have a fit test conducted by a qualified professional. During this fit test, your entire position on the bicycle will be evaluated and adjusted if needed.

One main area of adjustment will be the position of the bicycle saddle. From my experience, I believe that the saddle should be approximately level and not tilted too far up or down. If the saddle is pointed up, then you will put too much pressure on your crotch area and will probably experience numbness. Conversely, a downward tilt will force your body to slide forward, putting more pressure on your crotch and your hands on the handlebars.

Some manufacturers offer saddles with the center area depressed or cut out. This solution has also been debated vigorously. Some people have remedied this problem by switching to recumbent bicycles. The recumbent seats are similar to sitting in a chair, which spreads your weight over a larger area."

My favorite bicycle saddle, for more than 20 years, was the Selle Atalia Turbo but I'm riding a full carbon 3-T on my Fat. 

image.jpeg

Edited by Tabletteer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I may be the first person who has figured this out, or merely the last.  With that said I'll post anyway in case it helps someone else.

I installed my PakRak a couple of months ago based on the info here.  It worked great.

Since then I reduced my tire size to 26x4.0.  Eyeballing the rack earlier this evening it seemed to me that there was no reason I couldn't lower the rack and the center of gravity of all the crap I carry around.  Short version:  It worked great.

Long version:  

  1. With the rack installed, using the 4mm hex wrench completely remove the two bolts holding the rack onto the frame via the height adjustment rod... the two bolts down low on the side.  the rack is now being held up by the stays up top.
  2. Also with the 4mm hex wrench, loosen the stays at the point where they connect to the frame.  Not a lot.  Maybe a couple turns.
  3. Now with the 5mm hex, loosen the stays at their origin point up top under the rack.  Again... just a couple three turns so they are loose and movable.
  4. The rack is now only being held in place by a bit of spring tension.  What I did next was simply put my hand on the top of the flat of the rack and push down.  The rods up front don't quite want to go until they rotate down with the changed angle of the rack.  Once they do change angle a bit, they will be able to slide in the amount needed to continue to keep the rack level.
  5. When the forward rods reach their limit of travel (now they abut against the two rods running along the base of the rack instead of being just barely in their mounts) you are as far down with those rods as you can get.  Switch to the lower height adjustment screws on the sides.
  6. You will find that the screws can now be aligned at the bottom-most adjustment hole.  If the extended light mounting plate at the rear of the rack is still clearing the tire, you can insert and tighten the side screws in the lowest adjustment hole and follow with all the rest of the screws you loosened earlier.

If you take a look at Alienmeatsack's Vee Speedster tires, which are 3.5's, there is plenty of room to lower the rack as described above, and for those of you who keep your seats low but can't go as low as you want because it hits the rack, this will minimize if not totally solve this problem.

By moving the front chainstay rods to their maximum amount of insertion as described in step 5 above, you will put your rack at a slightly forward angle.  If you want to level it, just back it off a bit to where you want it before you tighten the side bolts.  Me, I like the rake as in a pinch it will help keep my Ibera saddlebags from bouncing off the back in case of some kind of failure of the (not so hi tech) velcro straps..

For my Vee V8 26x4.0's, I still have about 1/4" of clearance which is plenty.  If you are still using the Chao Yang 4.9 Big Daddys or similar big fat fatties... move along.  Nothing to see here (unless you can make the middle bolt work).

Edited by MattRobertson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very easy install, for those with height issues, I was able to slide the stock sondors seat on the post forward. There is an adjustment under the seat that if you loosen with Allen wrench allows you to move seat forward clearing the rack and the bags etc. 

 

Thanks for the detailed install instructions very helpful

image.jpg

image.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • By Yann
      Hi everyone,
      For about a day or two I have a quite big wobbling problem coming from my rear wheel. It was barely noticeable, but got worse to the point where my wheel is touching the frame when I'm turning left or right, and I can feel the bike wobbling when I'm riding. I should mention that I added an extra seat at the back, and I'm using it daily to bring my girlfriend and myself to work (which I'm not doing anymore since this issue obviously). So far, I have tried to tighten the wheel as much as I could with my 18mm wrench, but that didn't change anything really. 
      Do you have any idea: 
      - What the problem actually is ?
      - What replacement parts will I need to fix that ?
      Since the motor seems to be fairly well integrated to the wheel axis, does that mean I might have to buy a new motor if let's say the axis is bended or something like this ? Is it worth bringing the bike to a bike shop regarding how particular this one is ?
      Thanks in advance for you answers !
    • By Biocharster
      I just bought a used Sondors and want to mount a rack,  which I have.
      What size bolt? 4MM? 5MM? 
      I cannot seem to find a reference anywhere, Did I miss it?
       
    • By Ole Dokka
      Anyone mounted a rack to carry longboards & paddle boards on their Sondor fatbike?
      Any recommendations?
      Ole / Norway / Soon X owner
    • By SondorsinPV
      Sondors in Puerto Vallarta
      Hola Sondors community!
      Here I am in sunny Puerto Vallarta,  waiting for my next visitor to bring me my brand-new bike. There's been a delay as I did not realize that the Airlines would not transport the bicycle with the battery. When I when I arrived however, they took the bike in, checked me in and put me on the flight. I didn't find out that my Sondors Custom Aluminium would not be joining me on the flight until after the doors of the airplane had already been shut. Imagine you are a kid coming downstairs on December 25th, to find out your parents converted to Russian Orthodox and Christmas is on January 7th now. Times five.
      Rather than shipping the current battery from California to Puerto Vallarta,  I have decided to just order an upgraded battery and controller and have those shipped by the seller. Now, my next question has to be, what battery will best compliment my upgrade needs? I live on a hill about five blocks from the beach and need to get up that hill at the end of each ride. I'm in the Old Town part of PV, which adds cobblestones to the mix, which I'm hoping the fat tires will mitigate. I'm thinking I will want to upgrade the rear hub motor to a 750, any suggestion as to which battery I should order with that in mind? Since much of my riding is on cobblestones, will I need upgraded forks?
      I'm grateful to have this great forum and to now be a member of the Sondors community. As soon as both battery and bike make it here, I will get some drone footage of the Sondors on the Beach.
      Todd 

    • By Josh Wardell
      Brake light system
      I completed my prototype brake light system a few weeks ago and just made a quick video demonstrating it. I'm curious if others would be interested in a polished version of this:
       
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWdGi-8JsaI
       
      I'm using real Higo connectors so it is plug and play into the brake wires without modification.
      My prototype uses a separate 12v converter (I will also be powering a horn) but I will design it to be powered directly from any battery 30-60v.
      The tail light has a solid low light with occasional blink when powered, and goes to full brightness when either brake handle is pulled.
      I made my own light and bracket from bright waterproof LED strips, but I would probably bundle this with a real reflector light made for automotive use.
      Would anyone have an interest in this if I were to design a board and make a dozen or two of these? Any opinions or changes?
      Also, I tapped into the battery wires, I'm not sure I can make the battery plug and play because I believe the connector is different depending on fat or thin or 3rd party batteries, can someone confirm that? Or I could make a plug & play Y adapter for fat.
       
  • Popular Now



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.