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THIN inner tube


Electrified
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Hi, I just assembled my Sondors THIN e-bike and thought the rear tire could use a little more air. Before I reached maximum pressure, the inner tube exploded. Local bicycle shops do not carry the long valve stem. I have been unable to locate a Chaoyang distributor in the United States. And the Sondors parts store only offers tubes for the Fat. Does anyone know where I could find a 700 x 38/45C tube with a 60mm Schrader valve stem? The original tube was a Chaoyang part number 04096226. Please help me get on my bike and ride! Thanks.

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See my other posts. You should be able to find a 48mm Schrader that will barely work, depending on your pump head. That's what I'm using now. They are Kenda tubes and very common. Nothing shorter has a chance. You're doing the right thing trying to find a 60mm. A 55mm should be decent also. 55mm is what I measured the Chaoyang valve stem as, from the very base of the tube to the top of the valve stem. The other option is to find a 55mm or 60mm Presta valve tube and put in an adapter to fill the rim space so the valve stem doesn't get cut off at its base when the tube shifts around.The adapters are cheap.So far, it looks like finding a 55/60mm Presta valve in a 38C tube is also a challenge though. My LBS doesn't carry it.

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Thanks, Electrified:Exactly how does one order the THIN bike replacement inner tubes, are they schrader long stems ,what's the total cost, are they puncture resistant,etc. I couldn't find them at  gosondors.com. 

I'm interested in learning everything I can prophylactically,to Avoid having to change a flat tire on this bike, especially the rear tire.

I've read that some of the bikes have a paltry/minimal protective inner rim lining and that this causes some of the flats. I've also read something about using gorrilla tape  as an added layer for puncture resistance, and perhaps also if there is a paltry/minimal protective inner rim lining, but not sure exactly what specific type of Gorilla tape/ thickness, etc.

Is it worthwhile taking apart these tires to check for that?

Also, does anyone know if there's a universal toolkit for carrying with you in the event of needing to change either the front or rear tire or any other fairly common maintenance, while traveling far away from home on this bike?

Thanks,Boulderite

 

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I don't know about getting tubes from Sondors yet, but here's the other solutions:

1. Yes, it's worth taking off your wheel and checking what wheel tape you got. I recommend replacing with good wheel tape from LBS for $5 per wheel (or buy a roll and do it yourself). Also good practice for how to change a flat on this bike.

2. You can put tire liners in between your tube and tire at the same time you do #1. That's your cheap insurance against flats. I paid $12 for RhinoDillos. The tires are thick, but the liner should help for things like thin metal wires that can go through tires like this.

3. Toolkit minimum: A decent adjustable wrench, spare tube(s), tire lever, and a CO2 mini pump and cartridge &/or mini air pump. I also recommend carrying a pair of disposable nitrile gloves (surgeon gloves). I buy boxes of these on Amazon and use them for all my bike work.

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I had my first pinch flat a week ago, and also had an issue with my mini pump. I did have a nice stroll through the neighborhood that afternoon.

The next day, I bought a new mini pump and a new tube with the shorter 48 mm stem and made it work. I'll pick up a metal valve extension from the auto part store, in exchange for the plastic extensions I picked up the other day. The plastic extensions are light in weight, but are formed in a manner which, a clamp on pump chuck can not lock on to the stem extension, it just slips off. Maybe the metal extension will do the trick. I'm also going to try added tube sealent; "Slime" is the sealent I'm trying, along with tire liners. Especially, for the rear wheel. The rear is a bitch to mess with!

Sometime in the future, I will look into a tubeless conversion kit, such as "Stan's No-Tubes" tubeless conversion and sealant kit. I've converted ordinary mountainbike tire, to tubeless, and pitch flats and puncture flat were never a issue after the conversion.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I got a compression puncture (look like a snake fang) on the rear wheel twice this week. It was a pain to fix the rear flat. I used a patch kit to the repair. Then I decided that the OEM inner tube is too flimsy to support the weight of the rear wheel and the rider. I replaced the rear inner tube with a Slime 29" x1.85-2.20" Presta valve. Length of stem is 55mm. I rode 25 miles, through over a mile of gravel. The tire feels sturdy. Working great so far. It only costs $12 for the tube. 

Slime.jpg

Inner Tube.jpg

Stem.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Slime tube update. I rode another 25 miles this morning. Same course, riding over a mile of dirt road and gravels.  My rear wheel with the Slime inner tube is doing great. However, this time, I had a similar compression puncture on the front wheel. I'm kinda p*****. This was the first flat for my front wheel with the OEM inner tube. A total of three compression punctures so far. Taking off the front wheel on the trail was quite easy compare to the rear. Again, I used a patching kit to repair the tube and inflated the tire with 1.5 CO2 cartridges. One cartridge was probably enough. I had to use 1.5 because I didn't have the nozzle fit snugly. I don't think it's a coincident that I have had 3 compression flats and so many other Thin owners have had similar flats on so few miles on the road. I wonder if the Fat owners have had similar flats on so few miles. The Slime tube that I used look like a giant next to the OEM tube, but it's heavy duty and it fit. I'll be replacing my front inner tube with the Slime as well. I'm convinced that the OEM inner tube is an inferior match for the Thin ebike. And is probably pretty expensive once it's available on Sondors' parts store.

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Pinch flats (snake bite) are due to under inflation. I have a classic Cannondale Criterium Bike with very thin tires. 700x19 front and 700v21 rear tires. I've ridden it over 30,000 miles. I ride @ 145psi but I wouldn't recommend that for a thin. I ride my Sondors Fat @ 32psi.  

Edited by Tabletteer
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I get that. Compression punctures are sometimes caused by under inflation. On the Thin, I kept at 65-70psi, which is on the high end of the recommendation. I don't think the flats that I had were due to under inflation. I have owned  two earlier models (white and blue) of the Criterium Cannondale you mentioned and a Fuji road/tri bikes over the years. The first time I saw a Cannondale, I thought it was great because it was so much lighter and have larger Al frame tubing. I rode my first Cannondale on a 200-mile ride  at the Davis (CA) Double Century and my time was improved by 5 hours compare to a steel frame bike that I was riding the year before. I used mostly 700x19 tires as well. For me, same size both front and rear.  I normally kept  my PSI at 120-130. I have never gotten a flat on these rides. That's why it was unusual for me to get 3 flats on the Thin OEM tube in less than 80 miles. On my road/tri bike, I've normal rims in the beginning, and then evolved into deeper v-rim for aerodynamics reasons. I have used both clincher and tubular tires. I also understand that Shrader valve tubes are more commonly used on mountain bikes and fat bikes since these bike don't need the aerodynamics deep rims for all intents and purposes. So, the stems for the Shrader valve tube aren't made to be long. On the other hand, Presta valve tubes are more commonly used on road/racing/tri bikes. These bikes often have aerodynamic deep rims on them. Sondors could have easily bored a smaller hole on the Thin's deep rim for a Presta valve tube, where owners could easily find a replacement tube for about $5. But, instead he made the hole for the Thin tube Shrader size with long stem, which is not common in the market place. By doing so, Sondors is making the Thin OEM tube proprietary and more expensive. Fortunately, tires and tubes on bicycle are not precision parts like those in automobile or motorcycle.  I can mix and match when the OEM parts don't seem to work right.

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  • 2 weeks later...

@masbem I bought a set of 2 on ebay from http://www.ebay.com/itm/One-Pair-of-Slime-29x1-75-1-85-2-0-2-1-2-125-2-2-Smart-Tube-Bike-Tubes-Presta-/331317910007?hash=item4d241619f7:g:F4wAAOxy2CZTYCDf. The description reads length of stem as 1.5". But, I measured it to be 55mm (about 2.1") from bottom to tip. You can see the length is pretty close to the oems from the pic in my earlier post. So far so good. I had about 100 miles on the rear tire now and no flat yet. It already exceeded the oem tube milage. If the link doesn't work, search for "Slime Tube 29". The seller I bought from is Zbikenut.

Edited by Nickst
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On 7/31/2016 at 7:45 AM, Nickst said:

@masbem I bought a set of 2 on ebay from http://www.ebay.com/itm/One-Pair-of-Slime-29x1-75-1-85-2-0-2-1-2-125-2-2-Smart-Tube-Bike-Tubes-Presta-/331317910007?hash=item4d241619f7:g:F4wAAOxy2CZTYCDf. The description reads length of stem as 1.5". But, I measured it to be 55mm (about 2.1") from bottom to tip. You can see the length is pretty close to the oems from the pic in my earlier post. So far so good. I had about 100 miles on the rear tire now and no flat yet. It already exceeded the oem tube milage. If the link doesn't work, search for "Slime Tube 29". The seller I bought from is Zbikenut.

Hi, the THIN tires are stated as 28" on the sondors site, but the 29" inner tube fits fine?

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I've had my thin about 6 wks now and I agree with everyone- getting a flat , esp on the rear is a bitch. So I had my local bike shop put in a pair of Tiffy liners . Ironically, the next day I got a a flat on the rear tire and didn't have the right wrench to undo the rear , so had to call my wife to pick me up and bring the bike home . 

I then took it to Community Cycles ( we're blessed here in Boulder with a large community bike repair co-op, loaded with tools, stands, space, and most of all, a large group of bike enthusiast volunteers and a circulating bike repair Pro to help all of the members work on their bikes, whatever the issue may be. Here I learned how to change in repair of flat in my rear tire.  I also learned that the flat was described as a pinch flat, unrelated to any object, and in fact caused by the OEM paltry/minimal protective inner rim lining ( the mechanic described it as "a piece of crap" and doomed to cause further flats). So for five bucks I replace the interlining with Velox ,it's obviously much wider, has a mild adhesive which makes it easier to insert and to stay in position, and I'll be putting in on my front tire soon as well.Velox inner lining.JPG

I did a lot of online research, and ended up buying a product called flat attack, very similar to slime, but described as superior in terms of being guaranteed not to dry out, and to stay in working order for 5 years inside your inner tube,being "the original green", and using food-based propylene glycol as the vehicle, which they market as being much more environmentally safe compared to slime or the other products. I even spoke with one of the major distributors who said that it will not clog up your Schrader valve either. I haven't yet put it inside my innertube, but I'm carrying it with me, and plan to test it on one of my other lesser used bicycles, and then make a decision on using it on my Sondors thin.I also bought and carry with me an adjustable wrench and now can take off either tire.

 

Another issue with the bike is that it doesn't fit on my Hollywood rear bike carrier, I use a Hollywood F3 expedition trunk bumper Mount rack and didn't feel like having to buy a brand-new rack.  Fortunately there is a workaround here,they sell a Bike adapter Pro, and I use this with a sturdy rope as well so I can now transport my 'Thin' safely . 

Bottom line, I'd recommend a philosophy of 'constructive paranoia' ,  at a minimum, replacing the inner rim lining ( on both tires ) With something like Velox tape, becoming absolutely prepared with all proper equipment to change a flat, (Don't forget the 18 mm wrench or an adjustable wrench), and consider adding a well researched  inner tube sealant.

It's disheartening that Sondors didn't produce  the original thin  bike with far  better attention to detail/construction  on mitigating against flats, even if  they had to raise the price a little.

"Ride On " !!!!

Boulderite 

 

 

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I didn't measure the holes, and they were not all of the same size. The key point is that the OEM inner liner is barely wide enough to cover all of the holes, and only  if placed "perfectly'. The velox tape was much thicker ,wider,lays down better and easier to cover all the holes ( I don't know what the exact width was, I think 16mm , but not sure.

 I took  a quick look at your cross bar adapter, it's cheaper tha the one I bought , but I'd worry about it failing especially with these heavier Sondors bikes  ( a few of the reviews noted that it failed,or scratched up the bike.)  Be very sure that the bike seat is strongly attached, if it fails, you'll lose your bike !  I also attached a strong rope to the lower posterior frame of the bike and tied it onto the bike adapter pro, just in case there ever would be a posterior failure with the bike seat, I'd still have my bike attached .

Boulderite

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