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@LocalGuyTX that already exists in this thread.  you are going to have to scroll back thru a few pages but a complete parts list for one Thin conversion is in this thread.

As for one gear lower and one higher, I don't think thats going to happen.  Read thru the thread and you'll see that attempts to use freewheels that give exactly this came up empty, because the one freewheel on the market that can accommodate that wish does not fit.

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Thanks for the reply. I did later check back in the thread. 

I don't want a 25mph high gear, so a smaller chain ring is indicated. The link to the chain ring is unavailable anyway currently. 

I'll do the math to determine the correct number of teeth. I know that 44 tooth cranksets are readily available, but I am guessing that I'll want a bit more than that. 

For now I've ordered a new white chain for my white Thin original. My original chain has worn quickly. I even properly adjusted the chain of the bike out of the box, as it was way too tight. I'm a firm believer in replacing chains instead of cleaning and lubricating. "Stretched" chains eat up gears. Chains are cheap and have awesome lubricant already applied. Unless you are a road racer and require the maximum efficiency, I don't see the point in "chain maintenance". Save your chain cleaner and cassette brush for cleaning gears before the new chain is applied. Just one man's opinion. Please don't start a violent stream of angry replies in relation to this paragraph. ?

5-speed chain not long enough? A smaller front chain ring, which I intend to use,  might compensate. What do you think? 

Thanks! 

Edited by LocalGuyTX
Realized mistakes.

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http://www.livestrong.com/article/376621-how-often-should-i-lube-my-bike-chain/

Of all the parts that make up a bicycle, the drive chain is among those that receive the most wear. The chain is almost always in motion and under constant tension, bearing against other parts in the drive train. The chain is also open and exposed to any elements that can damage it, including water and dirt. Proper lubrication of your bicycle chain will help it to operate properly and also protect the rest of the drive train, including the derailleurs, crank set and rear wheel gear assembly, from additional wear.

Optimal Performance

If you are a frequent rider, using your bike several times throughout the week, your bicycle will benefit from a regular cleaning and lubrication of the drive chain. Bicycle Tutor recommends cleaning and lubricating your bike's drive chain at least once every month to maintain optimal performance and protection.

Take Action

Lubricate your bike drive chain immediately after use if you are riding in challenging conditions, such as mountain biking in dirty terrain or riding in the rain or other wet conditions. Also, clean and lubricate the drive chain on your bicycle if you notice it becoming dry, sounding noisy or if the chain links bind in any way.

What To Use

Using the proper lubricant will ensure the chain works correctly and can help to extend the life of the chain. Household spray lubricants are too thin and can actually dry out bicycle chains. Vegetable-based oils are a poor choice as these become gummy. Motor oils are too thick and do not penetrate the chain thoroughly. A mineral-based lubricating oil, specifically designed for bicycle parts is the best choice.

Lube Basics

To lubricate your bike chain, wipe the entire length of the chain with a clean rag to remove any dust, dirt or debris. Clean the chain rings on the front crank set and the gear assembly on the rear wheel hub. Apply the lubricant to the inner surface of the entire length of the chain. Turn the pedals and shift through all the gears to work the lubricant into the links of the chain and the other parts of the drive train.

Although I chose to use a wax based lubricant with volitial aromatic that evaporate after application, like White Lightning or Purple Extreme, that leave a dry lubricant that doesn't attract dirt, any application is better than no regular cleaning and application. Just what the rest of the cycling communities' real world's chain maintenance practices are.

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Yeah I would have to absolutely disagree on chain maintenance.  First of all, the goop covering a chain out of the bag is not chain lube generally but a preservative.  You're supposed to clean that off and then lube it :-)

Next, chains dry out far sooner .... far FAR sooner ... than they stretch.  First thing you want to do is use a chain wear tool which you literally drop onto the chain.  If it falls thru flat onto it the chain is worn.  My chain with 2300 miles on it has not yet worn to the point where it falls thru to the first warning indicator.  I use this one which costs $4.92

http://a.co/gK3boUW

I don't use brushes.  Just an old sock or a blue paper shop towel and... this stuff.  Just drip it over the chain as you spin it backwards and let it sit for a minute.  Then use the towel and wipe off the excess.  Takes about 5 minutes.  Don't do it again until the chain starts squeaking.  For me, riding about 150 miles / week, that means about every two months.

http://a.co/8JGs0gQ

I just resurrected my Stumpjumper after 12 years of storage.  And I bought a new chain but, for giggles and because I was a little lazy, instead of breaking and replacing the chain I did the above after I found the chain measured out to be perfect.  It took a godawful dry chain with a light and complete coating of surface rust and I ended up with a perfect and perfectly lubed chain.  5 minutes effort, 1/4 of a bottle of blue cleaner and I ruined a couple of paper shop towels.  I'll save the new chain for when its actually needed.

I am using that bottle for three bikes.  I bought it in January.  Its still half full despite the liberal use on the Stump a few days ago.

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I forgot you asked a question at the end of that last post and I forgot to answer it.  First, chain length has no relation to width; i e. single-speed like the stock Sondors, 5/6/7 speed, the narrower-still 8/9/10 speed and I think 11-speed rounds out the bicycle variations.

Chain lengths vary to a small degree.  Usually from 112 to 116 links.  You shouldn't worry about this because if you don't know for sure what chain length you need, just buy two of them.  Use your 'chain rivet remover' ("chain breaker") to remove links from your second chain to add to the first as needed.  Keep that second chain as a link donor for future replacements if it turns out its needed, or if not, save it for the next time you need to replace your chain.

But for sure don't adjust your gear ratios to match the length of the chain in the box.  Pick what suits you and then make the chain work for whatever gears you decide you want.

Edited by MattRobertson
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Ok did the conversion as many have suggested - works fantastic... 3 speed shifter is my only issue / question: how are others setting up the hand grip with the  throttle, shifter, grip together???

IMG_3035.thumb.JPG.29f70ddc2651188a95b2cb3c1604e189.JPGIMG_3036.thumb.JPG.f6d6e96d5d8d7b9db4d1018524c846b3.JPG

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26 minutes ago, Jeff B said:

Ok did the conversion as many have suggested - works fantastic... 3 speed shifter is my only issue / question: how are others setting up the hand grip with the  throttle, shifter, grip together???

What I did was to take the brake lever and throttle off the handlebar and swap them around... Like this...

  • Put the Shifter on the right handle bar

           IMG_4680.jpg

  1. Using an allen wrench, loosen the two bolts in the metal brackets on the right handle bar grip. 
  2. Then pull the right handle bar grip off the handle bars, clamp it in a vise, and using a fine tooth metal saw, saw about 2 inches off (8 columns of nubs)
  3. Using an allen wrench, loosen the mounts for the throttle and the brake lever and slide them BOTH off the handlebar
  4. Put the thottle back on, then the brake lever, then the shifter, then the rest of the right handle bar grip.
  5. Make sure the cable runs are okay, and then using an allen wrench tighten all of the mounting screws down.
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You can use an entirely different kind of shifter, too.  Search for this on Fleabay:

"Shimano Tourney SL-TX30 Shifter Set 3X7Speed Left Right MTB Bike Thumb Shifters"

Just use the left 3x shifter for your rear gears.  Its a friction shift so not a click-stop deal (my personal preference but maybe not yours).  

Ten bucks delivered to a U.S. address.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Shimano-Tourney-SL-TX30-L-3-R-7-Speed-Shift-Lever-Shifter-Bike-Bicycle-Part/272616133353?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D45041%26meid%3D6ba07af430ab446ebbdc4aff94444e3a%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D291669617565&var=571736343608

I am very much not a fan of cutting off or otherwise monkeying with the grips as I like a very specific type of endurance grip that is kinder/gentler on my palms and wrists.

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1 hour ago, Scott C. Kennedy said:

What I did was to take the brake lever and throttle off the handlebar and swap them around... Like this...

  • Put the Shifter on the right handle bar

           IMG_4680.jpg

  1. Using an allen wrench, loosen the two bolts in the metal brackets on the right handle bar grip. 
  2. Then pull the right handle bar grip off the handle bars, clamp it in a vise, and using a fine tooth metal saw, saw about 2 inches off (8 columns of nubs)
  3. Using an allen wrench, loosen the mounts for the throttle and the brake lever and slide them BOTH off the handlebar
  4. Put the thottle back on, then the brake lever, then the shifter, then the rest of the right handle bar grip.
  5. Make sure the cable runs are okay, and then using an allen wrench tighten all of the mounting screws down.

Thanks - that's exactly what I was looking for. The grip is a little shorter but the shifter ring makes up the space. Do you have any problem with the grip twisting on the inner side since the clamp is removed?

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On 7/6/2016 at 9:32 PM, MisterFixIt1952 said:

Here is a picture of my new 52t chainring. It has a guard and I can replace the tooth ring with a different size if I want to adjust the ratio.

MTB-Folding-bicycles-crankset-crank-BCD130-square-hole-52T-SINGLE-SPEED

http://www.ebay.com/itm/221914132726?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

I just received the second one for my girlie's bike. Fast shipping and well packed. This is really a well made product and hard to beat 

@ $37.34. It has a 130mm 5 point bolt pattern with a standard MTB 170mm length, same as the original SEB (Sondors E-Bike). The finish is really tough and the CNC machining is top notch. Great crankset and guard for the money.

MisterFixIt1952

does this one fit on the original fat version?

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5 hours ago, B-Dub- said:

does this one fit on the original fat version?

Without seeing the crankarms laying sideways to determine how far out they offset themselves, there's no way to tell. I can tell you for sure that this one does fit.  I have bought two of them for two bikes and not only do they fit a Sondors 1-speed Original, they also fit a 7-speed, which has wider chainstay spread.  And that fit is "just barely".  I have two other cranksets that do not fit so be advised that fitment is something of a crapshoot.

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/bike-Crankset-Bicycle-Parts-mountain-bike-BMX-Cranks-chain-wheel-BCD130mm-square-hole-52T-single/32734743548.html

@Houshmand Moarefi has used this crankset on a single-speed fattie.  Not sure if there is extra clearance for the 7-speed mod.  Note this is a 2-wheel crank so you'd want to remove one at install.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01LX27FWX/_encoding=UTF8?coliid=I2FIEWBLNSD06C&colid=1C6FRCE4XMFO9

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When deciding whether a different chain ring will help use this website www.bikecalc.com You can input all the variables and look up speed and cadence. I am using a double sprocket up front on both a Thin 3 speed and Fattie 7 speed. Since I have a derailleur (to maintain chain tension)  I can switch to the smaller front sprocket by hand if I need low gearing. To switch sprockets I just pedal backwards (while off the bike) and pull the chain toward the smaller sprocket. It took a little while to figure out proper chain length but that was the only issue I have had.

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On 8/7/2017 at 12:03 PM, WillA said:

When deciding whether a different chain ring will help use this website www.bikecalc.com You can input all the variables and look up speed and cadence. I am using a double sprocket up front on both a Thin 3 speed and Fattie 7 speed. Since I have a derailleur (to maintain chain tension)  I can switch to the smaller front sprocket by hand if I need low gearing. To switch sprockets I just pedal backwards (while off the bike) and pull the chain toward the smaller sprocket. It took a little while to figure out proper chain length but that was the only issue I have had.

good idea

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Another happy converter here, many thanks to all of you guys showing us what's possible!

As a Norwegian, Amazon.com isn't always an option. Shipping is expensive, if it's possible to get it shipped here at all. Luckily we have a store chain called Biltema carrying at lot of the parts needed.

My parts list:

Three speed freewheel from eBay
Shimano Nexus 7-speed Gear changer (Would not recommend)
Shimano Tourney Deraileur
Chain (1/8") (A bit short, added four links from original Sondors chain)
Front chain ring and arms (46 tooth)
A few cable ties and washers

One of the first problems I had when I got my bike was with a broken freewheel. At the time I felt the conversion was too hard, and opted for a simple drop.in replacement with a better quality Shimano Freewheel. This made the conversion a bit easier, and less threatening - the worst part had been done before, and the Simano freewheel can be remounted if thing didn't work out.

Overall the job was medium hard for me with very little mechanical experience. Anyway, here is my story if you have a bit of spare time.

Removing the freewheel and mounting the new was a piece of cake. Remounting the back wheel with deraileur was hard, but only because I had to remove the fenders I had installed first... Front chain ring was an exciting job as may does not fit due the the geometry of the bike. These fit however, so no problem at all. Used the opportunity to tighten the bottom bracket a bit. The original locking screw on the chain ring side for the crank had stripped thread. Luckily new screws were included with the arms.

I had bought a new chain for 6-speed bikes, a 3/32" sized chain. This just got stuck to the front chain ring, and frustrated me a lot. After a bit of research and rereading this thread I got out and bought a 1/8" sized chain instead. This worked well on the front chain ring, but the master link got stuck in the deraileur..... Ahhhrrrrggggg!!!!!

After a bit of hair pulling and shouting of some derogatory words and name calling I calmed down enough to remember that the cain breaker can be used to reattach links. This worked out just fine, and all that was left was add the shifter and wire. I chose the right side, and rearranged everything on the handle bars around. The current placement is not optimal, so this needs a bit more tinkering. Running the cable was as difficult as choosing where it would look best. The sheath is a bit long, but a quick cut with the old Dremmel fixed that.

At last it was just basic adjustments left to do. The shifter pulls too much cable resulting in only first and third gear being usable. Anoying, but not a deal breaker. I plan on swaping it out, but what I really need is just the two working gears so... 

A few pictures of the result:

59dd0ffe4334e_2017-10-1019_04_45.thumb.jpg.4e734f0e413bd6373bf2deabf4867972.jpg59dd10036a915_2017-10-1019_04_54.thumb.jpg.9ef3329a318e691bed11987bd6aaa93c.jpg59dd100c6b1ab_2017-10-1019_05_32.thumb.jpg.3bf9e88202ce04d21763c48d09865159.jpg59dd10117d851_2017-10-1019_05_46.thumb.jpg.fb6413f59a6c96144a0371f986675e9d.jpg

2017-10-10 19.05.08.jpg

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On 7/17/2017 at 4:49 PM, MattRobertson said:

You can use an entirely different kind of shifter, too.  Search for this on Fleabay:

"Shimano Tourney SL-TX30 Shifter Set 3X7Speed Left Right MTB Bike Thumb Shifters"

Just use the left 3x shifter for your rear gears.  Its a friction shift so not a click-stop deal (my personal preference but maybe not yours).  

Ten bucks delivered to a U.S. address.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Shimano-Tourney-SL-TX30-L-3-R-7-Speed-Shift-Lever-Shifter-Bike-Bicycle-Part/272616133353?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D45041%26meid%3D6ba07af430ab446ebbdc4aff94444e3a%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D291669617565&var=571736343608

I am very much not a fan of cutting off or otherwise monkeying with the grips as I like a very specific type of endurance grip that is kinder/gentler on my palms and wrists.

Matt, do you have a photo handy of your shifter mounted on your bars?

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FYI, you can't use a 3 speed front shifter for the rear, because the rear gear spacing is different from the front. You have to use a rear shifter for the rear, which means you'll have some unused positions on your shifter. I used a 7 speed twist shifter.  I've tried Shimano, GripShift, and MicroShift. The micro worked the best.

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22 hours ago, biknut said:

FYI, you can't use a 3 speed front shifter for the rear, because the rear gear spacing is different from the front. You have to use a rear shifter for the rear, which means you'll have some unused positions on your shifter. I used a 7 speed twist shifter.  I've tried Shimano, GripShift, and MicroShift. The micro worked the best.

I believe a three speed friction (not click) shifter has been used by some 

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On 3/5/2018 at 8:09 AM, biknut said:

FYI, you can't use a 3 speed front shifter for the rear, because the rear gear spacing is different from the front. You have to use a rear shifter for the rear, which means you'll have some unused positions on your shifter. I used a 7 speed twist shifter.  I've tried Shimano, GripShift, and MicroShift. The micro worked the best.

I guess it was already pointed out but to be clear I was talking about a *friction* shifter... Look at that ebay ad and its the one marked simply '+/-'. ... a dinosaur from eons past before index shifters evolved and crawled out of the mud.   

@nikwax sorry no pictures.  I ended up going AWD and pulled the shifters off in their infancy... to make room for two throttles (2 motors = 4Kw = gears unnecessary).

 

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Thanks Matt.

I think the thing I'm not liking about the three speed conversion is that all of the three speed freewheels that I've looked at (including the one I bought) cannot be removed non-destructively. I'd prefer to have a freewheel with a tool for removal, like the Shimano single I installed recently.

Which raises a side question: is it possible to convert a single speed fat to a 5 or 7 speed? That would land us in the land of less kludge and more standard parts. I assume that the frame would need to be spread a bit at the dropouts. Maybe I'll hit the search function ;-)

 

 

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It is possible to remove the freewheel without killing it. Although you do end up with a rather large pile of ball bearings, all trying to run away and be free!.

There is no way to convert the stock hub to a cassette type freewheel. That requires a different Bafang hub. Some of the new Sondors have this upgraded hub. I think it is a 500 W motor. You need a shimano type spline on the motor hub. The problem is that the coli half of the motor has the freewheel spline on it is the part that is not replaceable, at least not that I have seen. I know that you can buy the other half, the planetary gear side, either as an upgrade to a 500W motor or as a replacement for the 350W, for a repair. Also, I think that it is just about as expensive as replacing the whole motor with a cassette spline type 350 or 500W motor.

Both of my original fat bikes are single speeds with a 3 speed conversion. If I was buying a new bike I would definitely buy the 7 speed model with the 500W motor and the pneumatic forks upgrade. Although the price is quite a bit more than the $695 (including shipping) that I paid for my bikes. Since the city I live in is mostly flat, at least where I usually ride, a three speed fits my needs just fine.

I still haven't had time to finish my three speed conversion on both of my bikes. I have added fenders, a really nice schwinn rack on the back and an upgraded controller and LCD panel. The electronic shifter that I have designed is the last step. I have been waiting until I finished the remodel of my home shop so I have some room to work. Also I just bought a 3D printer so I could print a case for the linear stepper mechanism and arduino that shifts the derailleur. Total cost of the shifter is about $30 in parts, including the handlebar switch. As soon as I get the printer assembled and running I plan on taking some pictures and posting an instructable on how I built the shifter. The shifter might mount inside the battery box or zip tie to the wheel strut with a 7.5V  lithium battery inside the battery box. I could possibly just use the 12V accessory lead to power the unit using a cheap step-down regulator for the 5V.  I'll decide when I get the unit finished or at least breadboarded. If I use an outboard battery, I can still shift if I need to pedal in, low on juice

The neat thing about  an electronic shifter is the ability to tweak the shift to match the cog spacing of the three speed freewheel. Once the  basic shifter is finished I plan on attempting to add an automatic shift mode that will use the pedal assist sensor to automatically upshift the gears and maybe downshift to low when I stop. It's important to downshift while still moving the chainring so you are in low gear when you start up. still not sure how I might accomplish this, maybe using the break cutout switch in conjunction with the cadence sensor and a current sensor connected to the arduino. That's the cool thing about using an arduino for a controller, you can add sensors to the input pins and change the programming to match new functions.

If anyone is interested in this project, check out youtube. Search for servo controlled bike shifters. There are at least 2 videos posted, three when I get mine finished. Both of those projects use an RC model servo to do the shifting whereas I'm using a micro stepper linear servo for mine. The programming is the same, just a different power mechanism. If my method fails, I will also convert mine to a servo. The servo that they are using costs about $25-30 and the one I'm using is only $10 (including shipping). Also, since mine uses a lead screw I think that it will hold the shift position more securely than a srvo, and use less power. The stepper is really tiny and runs on 5V. I should be able to run the stepper directly off of the arduino pins without needing a stepper driver inbetween. If I do need the driver, they are really cheap, costing just a couple of bucks, each.

One last Item I would like to mention is the spare battery I installed in the battery box. I didn't have the bucks to upgrade to a larger main battery, like a lot of people do. Instead I purchased a  36V hoverboard battery off of eBay for $50. It's half the AmpHrs of my original battery but it gives me enough extra range to get home in a pinch. Kind of a spare tire. I just wired a simple switch to cut out the main battery and turn on the backup.. Since the backup is also 36V I can charge it up using my regular charger by just leaving it turned on while charging. Also the battery is small enough to easily fit into the battery box with the main battery. Definitely beats spending $300-500 on a new bigger battery, which would also cause me to want to upgrade the motor to a 500 or 750A  56V hub, and so on and you know the drill. Power makes you greedy once you step over the line. For the time being I'm happy with my bike, as is, with the planned upgrades. If I was to want more, I would probably just sell mine and get the upgraded model with the 7 speed and bigger motor.

Anyway, spring is on the way and riding time is near. Time to shake off the frost put away the cold weather gear and get ready for some fun in the sun. Yehaa!

MisterFixIt1952....Have fun Y'alll

Edited by MisterFixIt1952
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For help removing the original freewheel without destroying it check out this post on the Sondors upgrade FaceBook page.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/103170603368320/?ref=group_header

Check out the article by Steve Condie. Great Piece of work.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/103170603368320/permalink/229902797361766/

 

 

 

Edited by MisterFixIt1952

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On 3/6/2018 at 10:18 PM, MisterFixIt1952 said:

It is possible to remove the freewheel without killing it. Although you do end up with a rather large pile of ball bearings, all trying to run away and be free!.

There is no way to convert the stock hub to a cassette type freewheel. That requires a different Bafang hub. Some of the new Sondors have this upgraded hub. I think it is a 500 W motor. You need a shimano type spline on the motor hub. The problem is that the coli half of the motor has the freewheel spline on it is the part that is not replaceable, at least not that I have seen. I know that you can buy the other half, the planetary gear side, either as an upgrade to a 500W motor or as a replacement for the 350W, for a repair. Also, I think that it is just about as expensive as replacing the whole motor with a cassette spline type 350 or 500W motor.

Both of my original fat bikes are single speeds with a 3 speed conversion. If I was buying a new bike I would definitely buy the 7 speed model with the 500W motor and the pneumatic forks upgrade. Although the price is quite a bit more than the $695 (including shipping) that I paid for my bikes. Since the city I live in is mostly flat, at least where I usually ride, a three speed fits my needs just fine.

I still haven't had time to finish my three speed conversion on both of my bikes. I have added fenders, a really nice schwinn rack on the back and an upgraded controller and LCD panel. The electronic shifter that I have designed is the last step. I have been waiting until I finished the remodel of my home shop so I have some room to work. Also I just bought a 3D printer so I could print a case for the linear stepper mechanism and arduino that shifts the derailleur. Total cost of the shifter is about $30 in parts, including the handlebar switch. As soon as I get the printer assembled and running I plan on taking some pictures and posting an instructable on how I built the shifter. The shifter might mount inside the battery box or zip tie to the wheel strut with a 7.5V  lithium battery inside the battery box. I could possibly just use the 12V accessory lead to power the unit using a cheap step-down regulator for the 5V.  I'll decide when I get the unit finished or at least breadboarded. If I use an outboard battery, I can still shift if I need to pedal in, low on juice

The neat thing about  an electronic shifter is the ability to tweak the shift to match the cog spacing of the three speed freewheel. Once the  basic shifter is finished I plan on attempting to add an automatic shift mode that will use the pedal assist sensor to automatically upshift the gears and maybe downshift to low when I stop. It's important to downshift while still moving the chainring so you are in low gear when you start up. still not sure how I might accomplish this, maybe using the break cutout switch in conjunction with the cadence sensor and a current sensor connected to the arduino. That's the cool thing about using an arduino for a controller, you can add sensors to the input pins and change the programming to match new functions.

If anyone is interested in this project, check out youtube. Search for servo controlled bike shifters. There are at least 2 videos posted, three when I get mine finished. Both of those projects use an RC model servo to do the shifting whereas I'm using a micro stepper linear servo for mine. The programming is the same, just a different power mechanism. If my method fails, I will also convert mine to a servo. The servo that they are using costs about $25-30 and the one I'm using is only $10 (including shipping). Also, since mine uses a lead screw I think that it will hold the shift position more securely than a srvo, and use less power. The stepper is really tiny and runs on 5V. I should be able to run the stepper directly off of the arduino pins without needing a stepper driver inbetween. If I do need the driver, they are really cheap, costing just a couple of bucks, each.

One last Item I would like to mention is the spare battery I installed in the battery box. I didn't have the bucks to upgrade to a larger main battery, like a lot of people do. Instead I purchased a  36V hoverboard battery off of eBay for $50. It's half the AmpHrs of my original battery but it gives me enough extra range to get home in a pinch. Kind of a spare tire. I just wired a simple switch to cut out the main battery and turn on the backup.. Since the backup is also 36V I can charge it up using my regular charger by just leaving it turned on while charging. Also the battery is small enough to easily fit into the battery box with the main battery. Definitely beats spending $300-500 on a new bigger battery, which would also cause me to want to upgrade the motor to a 500 or 750A  56V hub, and so on and you know the drill. Power makes you greedy once you step over the line. For the time being I'm happy with my bike, as is, with the planned upgrades. If I was to want more, I would probably just sell mine and get the upgraded model with the 7 speed and bigger motor.

Anyway, spring is on the way and riding time is near. Time to shake off the frost put away the cold weather gear and get ready for some fun in the sun. Yehaa!

MisterFixIt1952....Have fun Y'alll

Im gonna use 4 hoverboard batteries, use the sondors as the spare...

17.6 amps

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