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MattRobertson

Pedals?

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I've been doing a lot of looking around and reading these last 24 hrs since I put my order in.  Perhaps I am mistaken but it seems just about no one is replacing the flat pedals with something you can clip into for improved application of force in the pedal stroke.  In the olden days this was done with toe clips, but that was followed with a variety of mechanisms to keep you from falling over at stop lights - i.e. they let you clip back out when the need arises.

Is everyone just focused in a different direction (the throttle) or am I missing something?  There's a lot to be gained by using more of that pedal stroke.

Plus I have the shoes in the closet still :-)

Edited by MoneyPit

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First, I am a complete newb when it comes to ebikes. I can't see a reason for clips or even toe cages with my Sonders original. The pedal assist, even at the first level requires such little effort that, for me, at least, you should just save your money and spend it on some other accessory.

 

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Well, I just ordered an ebike yesterday so I can't get any greener on them unless it was yesterday.  But insofar as cycling goes I have decades of daily commuting and a fair bit of recreational riding, so its hard for me to let this go easily.

ATB clips and straps are $8.72 on Amazon, so not much money involved here.  Now that I am looking I also see there are such things as strapless clips which would completely preserve convenience.  From a quick bit of googling:

https://store.bikefriday.com/index.php?cPath=50

With plain pedals, you are applying pressure for only about 25% of the pedal stroke (on a clock face, the stroke goes from about 1:30 to 4:30).  With open clips a non-motivated person can go to 50% of the stroke no problem.  Call it 11:30 to 5:30 on the clock face.  Tighten them (you can still pull out if wearing street shoes) and try to work it and you can go to a little more into the upstroke.

Going to a full pedal stroke is no joke in terms of the effort and training required, and is a choice understandably most people would not make.

But dang it sure seems like for almost no money you can double your pedaling efficiency with zero loss of comfort and little physical effort - especially if you are dealing with terrain that stresses the motor and sucks down battery power.

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My buddy and ride partner (too much of a purist to do e) who owns a bike shop, can't understand why I don't go clipless on the Sondors, I have some rendition of clipless or Clips on all bikes but my Fats. I did have these Straps on my bike until yesterday. Unfortunately that aliexpress store is gone now, but they are a simple, cheap addition/solution. 

image.jpeg

I removed the stock pedals and straps to install these folding pedals and Diabolus, the path to park my Sondors in my studio, is narrow and I've had bruises on my shins since I got my CopperHeaded-RattleMoccasin e3, my rebranded Sondors, but these folding are more to keep me from having to remove a pedal, that hits the trunk lid on my Jetta, when carrying my bike on the hitch carrier. 

http://www.niagaracycle.com/categories/sunlite-bicycle-folding-pedals-9-16-in-pair

image.jpeg

i think most seasoned cyclists pedal like Lance Legstrong with his shoes on fire, regardless of PEDAL ASSIST. it's natural to give it all you can, based on all factors and available information. 

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Thx all for your thoughts.  There is no wrong answer.  Just get out on the bike and enjoy it your way.

I wound up picking up some Performance Bike pedals on sale that have Shimano SPD clips on one side, and are plain on the other.  $35.  Also picked up some ATB toe clips for $7 from the same site.  If I decide to dust off my bike shoes - which have SPD cleats  -  and use them, I'll leave the clips off.  If I decide to ride in street shoes, I'll just ignore the side that has cleats and put the clips on the other.

Edited by MoneyPit

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My Sidi (frigg'n expensive shoes) have vintage Dura Ace SPD-R cleats to match the Dura Ace 7700 Pedals in the 25th Anniversary Gruppo on my Litespeed Vortex. I tell my friends who golf, I'd love to but I can't afford another pair of expensive shoes. ))

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Yeah my road shoes are a pair of Sidi Genius II's so I sorta know where you are coming from :-).  Nothing like em.  I used them with the toe clips that came with my '84 Mavic SSC group, then went Look when I finally decided to go clipless.  Now they are SPD'd as I last used them on my Stump, which has itty bitty Performance Forte SPD compatible pedals on it.

Speaking of that brand, here are the pedals from http://performancebike.com.  I hadn't noticed but I see now they actually come with a set of cleats.  Not bad for $35

00-1473-NCL-ANGLE.JPG?resize=415px:415px&output-quality=100

A couple of bucks more ($39 on sale right now) is their Boulevard pedal.  i would have gone this route as its right for this style of bike but there's no option to try out toe clips.  Cleat on one side, big flat platform on the other.  $39.

50-8259-BLK-ANGLE.jpg?resize=700px:700px

And for $49 they also have a Shimano-branded pedal that also comes with cleats.  About 50g lighter too (as if we care on this platform).

50-8219-SIL-SIDE.JPG?resize=700px:700px&output-quality=85

 

 

 

 

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Just to update the thread:  My pedals, toe clips and straps came in today.  I knew I was going to do this so I installed my Sondors pedals just barely tight on the crank arms.  They came right off no problem and the forte pedals went right back on smooth as can be.

If you are going to use toe clips, these are the wrong pedals to choose.  See picture above.  First of all they only have a strap slot on the exterior cage - none in the interior body.  This is not a big deal as you can route the strap over/under the arms of the body in a way that works fine.  More annoying was the fact the cleat mechanism intrudes into the area where the toe clip bolts on.  You can almost get the nut in the right spot... Maybe I would have gotten it if I kept trying, but a screw-on plate keeping fitment from happening was just dressing and not a part of the cleat mech, so I removed it and gained the needed space.  

If anyone wants to go this route, these pedals are cheaper, a slightly larger platform and made specifically to accept clips:

00-0427-BLK-ANGLE.jpg?resize=200px:200px&output-quality=75

Forte ATB Comp Pedals.  $19.99

Link:  http://www.performancebike.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10052_10551_1033460_-1_400937__400937

Riding after install I was very pleased.  You leave the straps loose so the opening for your foot is large.  I was able to get into the pedal easily with just my foot flipping the pedal and planting inside it.  From that point forward they were unnoticeable, except pedaling was noticeably more effective.  These wider ATB-style clips are perfect for this kind of riding.  The motor starts to struggle and lose speed when going over overpasses.  I had to pay attention to the dash to notice the difference, as it didn't feel any more difficult to pedal, but the dash showed I was moving faster than without the toe clips. My natural pedal motion took over - I didn't try to work harder - and my foot pressed to the front of the clip where otherwise you'd lift a bit to keep your foot from sliding off the pedal.  This provided extra energy to assist the motor.  

Thats typical for toe clips.  You can go up inclines faster and don't work any harder unless you want to.

Edited by MoneyPit

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