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THINearlyadopter

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THINearlyadopter last won the day on June 19 2016

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  1. Has anyone converted their Thin to 7 speed without changing the motor? I've seen the thread with the 750W motor that comes with a 7 speed cassette. I don't want to go that route yet, trying to keep this cheap.
  2. As of last night - and 7 more flat tubes later (most of them on the inner part of the tube) - I got tired of just replacing tubes. So I took both my wheels to my LBS and we spent an hour doing some serious troubleshooting. Problems/solutions: 1.) Rear wheel had a slight gap in the seam. That was bizarre. LBS squeezed it tighter. 2.) Rear wheel had bad metal burr at at least one of the holes (poor machining). LBS put extra patch of tape over that area. 3.) Original LBS tape was good stuff but not quite wide enough. Added extra wide tape this time to make sure all holes covered properly. 4.) I was not pulling the 48mm Qtube Shrader valve stem through the wheel far enough. Leaving a gap between the tube and the inner part of the wheel. It's hard, but LBS showed me how to pull it through far enough. These are the tubes my LBS sells and they seem to be good enough and not the root cause of my issues (although how I was installing them could have created a problem). 5.) The stock tires are too wide for the stock wheels, being forced to pinch in too much where they meet the wheels. LBS thinks that's bad, but maybe not my biggest issue. Stock tires are also fraying at the bead area, where they meet the wheels. Replaced with Continental Touring Plus 42 tires. Measured with calipers when inflated at 35, whereas the stock tires measure at 42 (same as their spec). The Continentals definitely seat better on the wheel and just look like a more natural fit. Should also have much better flat protection. Have to go from 40'ish (front)/50'ish (rear) PSI on stock tire to 50'ish/60'ish on these 35's. LBS said it's hard to say if any one thing is the root cause, but this was the best we could do. I'm feeling more confident now. Overall I'm frustrated with the cheap tires, cheap wheels, and hard to source tubes, etc...but I figure I got what I paid for, did this to myself. I wish Sondors had put a little more care into this area of the bike, including taping the wheels in the first place! On a positive note, I'm riding the bike almost every day since I got it and except for the wheels as above it's been reliable, battery still going strong, etc...the original concept of the bike is proving solid to me, with exceptions noted.
  3. I received my THIN on June 7th and have ridden it at least a few miles most days since then. These are my first impressions. Background/Baseline bikes: I have a friend who got the Sondors Fat tire bike and I tried that out prior to ordering the THIN. He has had an overall very good experience with it, especially after adding the LCD. I own and have ridden for many years a Trek 7.3 FX for commuting, which has many similarities to this THIN bike. I do what I call my "real riding" on a Specialized Roubaix for up to 10 hours/week. I’ve been involved in extensive maintenance and upgrades on both bikes, although I usually let my LBS do the tough stuff. THIN choice: I got the black bike with a chain. The white one with a belt looks pretty sweet. That extra visibility would be nice. But I wanted to get it quickly, and as cheap as possible to minimize my risk. Also, I have confidence in chains, with belts being an unknown for me. Unboxing/Assembly: Bike was well packaged. Took almost as long to unbox as it did to put together afterward. That’s a good thing and it made me feel better about the high shipping charge. The Sondors YouTube video on assembly was excellent and I followed it. Not much to do really. Was disappointed that the front wheel is not quick release. It pops on/off very quickly with a wrench though. Components: Overall appear to be a huge value. The battery/motor system appear well designed and sleekly integrated. Holding down the throttle with my thumb can get a bit uncomfortable after a while. The frame, wheels, tires are all decent. The brakes work fine so far. I like having a kickstand. Better tape (and tape at all) in the wheels would have been appreciated. The tires are beefy 38mm hybrids and help absorb shock. Slightly thinner tires, maybe with slick treads, could possibly offer less rolling resistance? But maybe reduce support for the heaviness of the bike, and limit off road or gravel capabilities. The tubes are an issue. Valve stems are 55mm so hard to source replacements for. 48mm’s are barely long enough but available at my LBS. Not including tape on my fully assembled front wheel is poor quality control. The thin rubber strip that was included on my rear wheel was weak. This might seem like a trivial detail to some people, and cheap to fix, but I consider it a huge oversight and even a safety issue. The hole that got created in my front tube by riding without wheel tape was big. I’m guessing this could create a blowout situation. If someone is going down a hill at 20 mph and the front tube blows out, that might not be pretty. Performance: The bike is fun to ride and can easily get you places with only soft pedaling required. Takes out the worry of hills and headwinds when trying to just do an easy ride. Nice! That’s exactly what I bought it for. I guess faster would be better, but this is not supposed to be a motorcycle. Should be even better with the LCD screen and 5 levels of assist. My buddy has that on his Sondors Fat bike and really likes it. Right now with my THIN it’s only full throttle or nothing and that can make pedal cadence tricky, making your feet bounce all over the pedals when going fast. I tried swapping in my clip-in pedals from my Trek and that definitely helps. I’m guessing the LCD control will improve this further. Range: IDK yet. I keep recharging mine every day just to be sure I don’t run out of juice. Furthest I go so far is about 14 miles in one day, with lots of assist, and it gets to red only on the small LED by the end of that. Looking forward to the LCD to help manage range anxiety. It’s a little annoying to have to unscrew the controller connection from the battery before charging the battery. Accessories: I added a seat post only mounted rack and attached two side panniers to that. Works very well to hold all my stuff. I bought the Kryptonite 997986 18mm New York Fahgettaboudit U-Lock, size 3.25 x 6-Inch. I'd recommend the longer version, this mini is very short. I recently bought a Bontrager Turbo Charger HP pump from a Trek store online for $60 after my Joe Blow Pro started leaking badly. The Bontrager is easily the best pump I've ever had or seen, and the smart head is working well with the 48mm replacement Schrader tubes I had to buy. I added Rhinodillos tire liners for extra flat protection, even though this might be overkill with the thick tires. Risk vs. Value: I was a bit concerned about the limited warranty and general support. Mostly I think the value is very high and offsets that, or I wouldn’t have bought the bike. Especially if the critical components will be available in the Sondors store and I can get any difficult servicing done by my LBS. Overall rating: If I had to create a "rating" for this bike and my overall impression, I'd give it at least a 9/10. That's based on currently available technology and the price of the bike and what its designed for. Form, fit, and function are all very impressive so far. It would be crazy to expect more features or performance at this price, and I think most people won't need anything more than this. But of course tweaks and upgrades could lead to even more fun... Next: I want my LCD!
  4. When I did the math for tire pressure using my weight, I came up with 53F/63R. After many many rides, I've actually settled on mid-40's for the front, and mid to low 50's for the rear. The tired drop appears negligible, and the comfort factor is MUCH better. 60's was definitely at rock hard level and just too much. You can get a huge gain in comfort, for bumps, etc..., by taking your tire pressure down to something that will still keep it from pinch flatting. In general, the THIN tires seem to do very well in the 40's, but I use more in the back because I put a lot of weight in my rear panniers. I finally got my first flat after adding my RhinoDillo tire liners. Looking at the tube, It was a pin prick next to a crease type mark. Had my LBS help me study it. Yeah, I'm a geek. Best guess is the liner shifted and the edge of the liner created the crease mark, which with wear led to the tiny hole. Recommendation is to somehow tape the liners in place so they stay over the middle of the tire. I didn't bother with the tape when I replaced this flat tube, but if it happens again I'm gonna try and figure something out. Not sure what tape to use, maybe will try some Gorilla tape I have. It's like duct tape but stronger glue I think.
  5. My LBS confirmed that both my THIN wheels were out of true. But he also said it wasn't very bad and he recommended I just ride it a bunch before bothering to true them. I am not having interference with the brakes.
  6. THIN Battery Charging Frequency? If I ride every day, and deplete my battery down to 5-10% by the end of every two days, should I charge every day, or every two days? My initial theory was that I could double my battery's life by charging every other day instead of every day. Since I would be charging it half as often. Then I read all the posts and links to Lithium-Ion best practices. Seems certain that it's better for general battery health to top off every day (say, 45% charge), vs. a 90-95% charge every two days. What's confusing me though is which method will result in the most lifetime charging cycles? I feel like running the battery through the charging process half as often should extend it's life. True or not true?
  7. Anyone have a chart on how the THIN 36V battery voltage (as displayed on the LCD) correlates to battery capacity? What # is full supposed to be? What # is dead? #'s in between there? Only thing I could find via search is this: "When the battery capacity is over 70%, the four power displays of the meter are lit, when the battery capacities drop, the four power displays are off in order, when the power capacity is less than 15%, the four power displays are totally turned off. " But that info. doesn't specify what the actual voltage correlation # is to each of the 4 power display bars.
  8. Thanks for the feedback 3D-vice! I will experiment with 1 and 0 for P3 and see which I like better. DIABOLUS - ~22mph is about the max I'm getting with the LCD on flat roads. Downhill will go faster. I didn't expect a lot more with this heavy bike and its default power system. Also - commonly known bike physics - once you get to this speed, going even faster requires exponentially more wattage due mostly to air resistance. Something interesting to check out...you can easily see this on the LCD under the W display. I'm finding that if I give up 1-3 mph (go a little slower, using assist 4 or 3 vs. 5) the W the bike has to put out is MUCH lower. This is a great way to save battery power with minimal loss of speed. On flat roads, or very slightly uphill, I'm seeing W drops from the 200's (at 5) to the 100's and below (at 4 or 3), at the same pedal cadence/effort, with again only 1-3 mph less result.
  9. Great! I'm up and running now and this LCD is pretty sweet. Now I have two new questions: 1.) What is the consensus on setting P3? 1 or 0? I'm still not sure I understand the difference this setting makes. I'm not sure the default of 1 is actually bad now, although I changed it to 0. 2.) Is there a guideline for using power assist on steep hills once you've removed the max MPH/power restriction? I have lots of hills and I'm concerned about motor burn out. For example, on assist level 5, I just saw my Wattage (W) go up to the 400's, when the max power is supposed to be 350W I think. Should I reduce my power assist level so that I don't go over 350W? Is there a specific number like that to aim for as max? Maybe I should keep my power assist level down to 4 or 3 on super steep hills and pedal harder? Would kind of defeat the point of using the bike to make my commute easy though.
  10. That would be great. Did you attach something? I can't see it. I did figure out that by default, when I pedal, the different assist levels are providing different levels of assist. i.e., seems like it's working as designed. And I don't have to hold the throttle button down - yahoo! I was holding the throttle button down before, hence the max power at all levels of assist. So at this point maybe I'm all set and "P3" (whatever that is) doesn't have to be changed?
  11. Hey, Nickst. How do you do this?: "(4) P3 to 0 instead of the default 1." It's not in the instruction manual. But as you said, by not changing "P3" the assist levels 1-5 all provide max. power. That's where I'm stuck right now after installing and adjusting all other settings successfully. I can't find a setting called P3 to adjust.
  12. This might be an impressive feat, depending on how far you went. It also made me curious...I just tried riding a bit on a flat to slightly uphill road with the power off and it was tough. Trying to ride a heavy, fixed gear bike like this is analogous to "mashing" on a bike with gears (using a very high gear with low cadence). There's going to be a lot of muscle fatigue from doing this, and you might break your knees. Really. Other than that, why not? Maybe once you get going and are really cruising, it won't be so bad. Plus it could make beer taste really good.
  13. I don't know about getting tubes from Sondors yet, but here's the other solutions: 1. Yes, it's worth taking off your wheel and checking what wheel tape you got. I recommend replacing with good wheel tape from LBS for $5 per wheel (or buy a roll and do it yourself). Also good practice for how to change a flat on this bike. 2. You can put tire liners in between your tube and tire at the same time you do #1. That's your cheap insurance against flats. I paid $12 for RhinoDillos. The tires are thick, but the liner should help for things like thin metal wires that can go through tires like this. 3. Toolkit minimum: A decent adjustable wrench, spare tube(s), tire lever, and a CO2 mini pump and cartridge &/or mini air pump. I also recommend carrying a pair of disposable nitrile gloves (surgeon gloves). I buy boxes of these on Amazon and use them for all my bike work.
  14. UPS e-mail 8 mins. ago: From: SONDORS EBIKES Package Weight: 1.0 LBS You have a package coming. Scheduled Delivery Date: Wednesday, 06/29/2016
  15. I received my THIN on June 7th and have ridden it at least a few miles most days since then. These are my first impressions. Background/Baseline bikes: I have a friend who got the Sondors Fat tire bike and I tried that out prior to ordering the THIN. He has had an overall very good experience with it, especially after adding the LCD. I own and have ridden for many years a Trek 7.3 FX for commuting, which has many similarities to this THIN bike. I do what I call my "real riding" on a Specialized Roubaix for up to 10 hours/week. I’ve been involved in extensive maintenance and upgrades on both bikes, although I usually let my LBS do the tough stuff. THIN choice: I got the black bike with a chain. The white one with a belt looks pretty sweet. That extra visibility would be nice. But I wanted to get it quickly, and as cheap as possible to minimize my risk. Also, I have confidence in chains, with belts being an unknown for me. Unboxing/Assembly: Bike was well packaged. Took almost as long to unbox as it did to put together afterward. That’s a good thing and it made me feel better about the high shipping charge. The Sondors YouTube video on assembly was excellent and I followed it. Not much to do really. Was disappointed that the front wheel is not quick release. It pops on/off very quickly with a wrench though. Components: Overall appear to be a huge value. The battery/motor system appear well designed and sleekly integrated. Holding down the throttle with my thumb can get a bit uncomfortable after a while. The frame, wheels, tires are all decent. The brakes work fine so far. I like having a kickstand. Better tape (and tape at all) in the wheels would have been appreciated. The tires are beefy 38mm hybrids and help absorb shock. Slightly thinner tires, maybe with slick treads, could possibly offer less rolling resistance? But maybe reduce support for the heaviness of the bike, and limit off road or gravel capabilities. The tubes are an issue. Valve stems are 55mm so hard to source replacements for. 48mm’s are barely long enough but available at my LBS. Not including tape on my fully assembled front wheel is poor quality control. The thin rubber strip that was included on my rear wheel was weak. This might seem like a trivial detail to some people, and cheap to fix, but I consider it a huge oversight and even a safety issue. The hole that got created in my front tube by riding without wheel tape was big. I’m guessing this could create a blowout situation. If someone is going down a hill at 20 mph and the front tube blows out, that might not be pretty. Performance: The bike is fun to ride and can easily get you places with only soft pedaling required. Takes out the worry of hills and headwinds when trying to just do an easy ride. Nice! That’s exactly what I bought it for. I guess faster would be better, but this is not supposed to be a motorcycle. Should be even better with the LCD screen and 5 levels of assist. My buddy has that on his Sondors Fat bike and really likes it. Right now with my THIN it’s only full throttle or nothing and that can make pedal cadence tricky, making your feet bounce all over the pedals when going fast. I tried swapping in my clip-in pedals from my Trek and that definitely helps. I’m guessing the LCD control will improve this further. Range: IDK yet. I keep recharging mine every day just to be sure I don’t run out of juice. Furthest I go so far is about 14 miles in one day, with lots of assist, and it gets to red only on the small LED by the end of that. Looking forward to the LCD to help manage range anxiety. It’s a little annoying to have to unscrew the controller connection from the battery before charging the battery. Accessories: I added a seat post only mounted rack and attached two side panniers to that. Works very well to hold all my stuff. I bought the Kryptonite 997986 18mm New York Fahgettaboudit U-Lock, size 3.25 x 6-Inch. I'd recommend the longer version, this mini is very short. I recently bought a Bontrager Turbo Charger HP pump from a Trek store online for $60 after my Joe Blow Pro started leaking badly. The Bontrager is easily the best pump I've ever had or seen, and the smart head is working well with the 48mm replacement Schrader tubes I had to buy. I added Rhinodillos tire liners for extra flat protection, even though this might be overkill with the thick tires. Risk vs. Value: I was a bit concerned about the limited warranty and general support. Mostly I think the value is very high and offsets that, or I wouldn’t have bought the bike. Especially if the critical components will be available in the Sondors store and I can get any difficult servicing done by my LBS. Overall rating: If I had to create a "rating" for this bike and my overall impression, I'd give it at least a 9/10. That's based on currently available technology and the price of the bike and what its designed for. Form, fit, and function are all very impressive so far. It would be crazy to expect more features or performance at this price, and I think most people won't need anything more than this. But of course tweaks and upgrades could lead to even more fun... Next: I want my LCD!
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